For congressional victory on Iran nuclear deal, Obama threw everything into uniting Democrats

In this Sept. 27, 2012, file photo, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel shows an illustration as he describes his concerns over Iran's nuclear ambitions during his address to the 67th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. Despite his speech to Congress, his efforts to halt the Iranian nuclear program _ which he describes as the mission of his lifetime _ appear to be stumbling as the U.S. seems to move toward a deal with the Islamic Republic. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
In this Sept. 27, 2012, file photo, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel shows an illustration as he describes his concerns over Iran’s nuclear ambitions during his address to the 67th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. Despite his speech to Congress, his efforts to halt the Iranian nuclear program _ which he describes as the mission of his lifetime _ appear to be stumbling as the U.S. seems to move toward a deal with the Islamic Republic. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

WASHINGTON (AP)—A lame-duck president, an empowered opposition, a looming election: They’re hardly the ingredients for a resounding White House triumph.

Yet President Barack Obama clinched a huge victory on the Iran nuclear deal in Congress this past week as Senate Democrats blocked GOP attempts to get a disapproval resolution to his desk.

Frustrated House Republicans settled for passing two related measures destined to go nowhere.

The outcome was especially notable for a White House with a history of bungling legislative initiatives on Capitol Hill, and a president known for a hands-off relationship with lawmakers, even his own Democrats.

This time was different—according to administration officials and lawmakers of both parties.

Comments

From the Web