Letters to Kamala: What the vice president-elect’s victory means to these Pittsburgh-area Black and Brown girls

 

I vividly remember the moment I first heard that Joe Biden had chosen Kamala Harris to run for vice president on his ticket. My mother excitedly told my sisters and me that Kamala Harris, a half Indian, half Black woman, could possibly be our future vice president. I was thrilled to hear the news. In the history of the United States, there has never been a woman as vice president, let alone a woman of color, and she is half Indian like me! I remember telling my friends who were also biracial, and we were all equally excited.

When I discovered that Kamala Harris was vice president-elect, I was overjoyed. This was a legendary moment in American history. As Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, “Women belong in all places where decisions are being made.” I believe this is true.

 

From left: sisters Asha, Arathena and Daya McCormick. (Courtesy photo)

 

 

In many of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris’s speeches, she highlighted the importance of her mother in her life. Kamala Harris’s mother, Shyamala Gopalan Harris, was an Indian woman who immigrated to the United States at age 19. She became a civil rights activist and fought against injustice. She surrounded her daughters at a young age with Black role models, and brought Kamala and her sister Maya to civil rights protests and taught them from a young age the importance of fighting injustice. Recently I have been learning more about America’s history and the injustices faced by people of color. Fighting for justice and equity for all people is important to me, and I am excited that our country’s vice president-elect is also passionate about these issues. Also, because Kamala Harris is a woman of color, she will better understand minorities and stick up for them. She will be able to see issues in government in a different light because she has experienced them.

Featured Image: A drawing by Asha McCormick of Kamala Harris in front of an American flag.

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Letters to Kamala: What the vice president-elect’s victory means to these Pittsburgh-area Black and Brown girls

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