AM Perfected: Develop a better morning routine to boost mental health

by Sherri Kolade

Many of us know that it takes 30 days to form a habit. And many others know how important it is to have a morning routine, but sometimes due to the busyness of the day, sticking to that routine can be a no-go based upon how many times we hit the snooze button and choose five extra minutes or so in bed.

So, let’s choose in 2021 to get out of bed early (or at least on time) and start the day off right and ready with a practical morning routine to get good vibes that can last from the morning well into the PM hours.

These ideas, provided by www.GoodTherapy.org, shine a light on healthy morning habits that can improve your mood and help you flourish.

When creating a morning routine, ask how much time, realistically, you have each morning. If you have a minimal amount of time, try to identify your biggest stressors as you go through the morning instead of trying to push different activities and tasks into a small time frame.

After the timing is settled, think about developing a habit could help in the long run. For example, someone who is unable to have a hearty breakfast might consider preparing their meal well ahead of time so that a healthy breakfast is ready to eat as you head out the door.

Also, let your morning routine work for you. Compare notes and see what other people are doing (YouTube is a helpful resource) for their morning routines. Then incorporate what routine steps you want to take in your own life and use them — for everything else that doesn’t fit right for you, feel free to discard. The website states that morning routines are based upon personal preference and what might work for one person would not work for another. And don’t feel bad. A morning routine is not about who is getting out of the house the fastest, but developing a routine with elements that can help set you up for a great mental health start to your day. It’s just not about that breakfast of scrambled eggs and bacon.

And regardless if you have several minutes or multiple hours each morning before you get your day going, really think about what routine works best for you to help you be in a better mental health mood throughout the day. And as a reminder, choose morning activities that allow you to work with rather than against yourself. And if you find you’re struggling with mental health symptoms that disrupt your well-being and daily activities, contact a licensed and mental health professional.

Find more information at www.GoodTherapy.org.

Comments

From the Web